Promote Innovation in Your Classroom, School and Organization

Promote Innovation in Your Classroom, School and Organization

Meet the Maker

Dawn EvensonDawn Evenson
Founder/CEO, iLEAD California

If you had to play one album forever, which one would it be?
Tea for the Tillerman by Cat Stevens

What movie have you seen recently that you would recommend, and why?
Hillbilly Elegy. It’s about overcoming trauma, and I believe many people who carry heavy burdens because of their past would find this interesting.

Have you ever been told you look like someone famous? Who was it?
Molly Ringwald. Most reading this probably don’t know who that is, but yeah, that was me in the early ’80s.

If you were independently wealthy and didn’t have to work, what would you do with your time?
Travel. Hands-down, I’d travel and experience other cultures.

What would you like to do when you retire?
Retire? What’s that? Don’t laugh. I’m serious.

Current favorite quote?
“The role of a creative leader is not to have all the ideas; it’s to create a culture where everyone can have ideas and feel that they’re valued.” –Ken Robinson

This Week’s Focus:

Learn to Be a Leader of Leaders

question mark iconDriving Question

Leadership is a journey. It is an ongoing discovery of self-awareness, self-growth and emotional intelligence. With that in mind, the DQ is the following:

What skills, attributes and practices can we, as leaders, use to promote creativity and innovation in our classroom, school or organization?

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Four-star general Stanley McChrystal regularly shares what he learned about leadership over his many decades in the military. In this TED Talk, he inquires how one can build a sense of shared purpose among people of many ages and skill sets. He explains that it’s by listening and learning — and addressing the possibility of failure.

The good leader is the one who appreciates and understands the value of each employee. The obvious truth is that anything amazing was not built or created single-handedly. Instead, it’s the combined efforts of several individuals. And the great leader understands this principle. She or he cultivates a culture in which each individual knows they have what it takes to contribute. In this TED Talk (“Forget the Pecking Order at Work”) former CEO of five businesses Margaret Heffernan explores the all-too-human thought patterns that lead organizations and managers astray:

So for all of us aspiring to lead in any way, what is the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work and giving every great idea a chance? In this TED Talk, Professor Linda Hill explains why some companies are better at leading innovation than others and why our conventional notions of great leadership are unhelpful when it comes to accommodating collective genius.

This final example challenges the myth of the superhero image of a leader who changes the world through massive feats of strength and superhuman powers. Instead, Drew Dudley says we change and lead the world by the small things that make an impact on a single person at a time.

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